The Review – Cussing, Violence, Porn, and Fonts

Kent Shaffer —  February 15, 2009

Here is the review of the best links of 2009′s 7th week.

Nine out of 10 parents swear in front of children
The average child hears their mother or father utter six expletives a week.  Two out five 11-year-olds were using swear words at an earlier age, admitting to using them in their everyday language because they heard their parents use them.

Five tips for better surveys
#2 Every question you ask changes the way your users think. If you ask, “which did you hate more…” then you’ve planted a seed.

How to Deal with Four Types of Online Troublemakers
(1) Trolls (2) Spammers (3) Lawbreakers (4) Meanies

1 in 4 Teens Think Violent Behavior is Acceptable
Research from Junior Achievement and Deloitte and conducted by Opinion Research shows that more than one-in-four teens (27 percent) think behaving violently is sometimes, often or always acceptable. More students thought violence was acceptable than was cheating (19 percent), plagiarizing (10 percent) or stealing (3 percent).

What Modern Men Want in Women
Researchers at the University of Iowa find that men increasingly are interested in intelligent, educated women who are financially stable — and chastity isn’t an issue.

Toddlers Who Gesture Are Smarter
Children who use gestures more as toddlers have better vocabularies entering kindergarten, research at the University of Chicago shows.

UK teens view 87 hours of porn online per year
The average teen spends over eight hours a week browsing soft porn, cosmetic surgery, dieting and weight loss, family planning and emotional support websites.

5 Things You Should Know About Kids And The Internet
(1) Of the 71.1% of kids who used the Internet in the last 30 days, 83.4% did their Web surfing at home. (2) Kids are far most likely to use the Internet for entertainment. (3) Nearly 1 in 3 U.S. kids ages 6-11 who used the Internet agreed with the statement “being ‘in style’ is very important to me.” (4) Of the nearly 50 Web sites measured by our study, 3 of the top 5 are TV sites among kids who used the Internet. (5) 57% of kids who surfed the Web did so because advertising drove them there. (via)

Alcohol Advertisements Attract The Young
Researchers found that exposure to TV alcohol advertisements was associated with an increased tendency to drink, as were magazine advertisements and concession stands at sporting events or concerts. Hours spent watching films, playing games and watching music videos also correlated with young peoples’ tendency to consume alcoholic beverages.

Adolescents involved with music do better in school
A new study in the journal Social Science Quarterly reveals that music participation, defined as music lessons taken in or out of school and parents attending concerts with their children, has a positive effect on reading and mathematic achievement in early childhood and adolescence.

WhatTheFont iPhone app
Identify fonts with your iPhone’s camera. (via)

Research on Technology’s Impact on Social Networks
Professor Noshir Contractor says, “What we’ve found so far is that technology isn’t changing our networks — it’s reinforcing them.”

THE REVIEW OF 2008
- Sex, Drugs in Rock n’ Roll
- Loneliness Increases Supernatural Belief

THE REVIEW OF 2007
- Teens Face a Dirty Internet
- 8 Steps to Mind Mapping
- The Atheists of Academia
- Free Photoshop Brush Sets :: the Ultimate List
- Using Tryvertising to Get Visitors to Your Church

Kent Shaffer

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I live in an RV with my wife and 2 kids and work with OpenChurch.com to help Christians collaborate and build a global Church library of free, open content.

3 responses to The Review – Cussing, Violence, Porn, and Fonts

  1. Do you have these links saved in delicious?

  2. No, the links are just saved in this post now.

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  1. How to deal with trolls, spammers, lawbreakers and meanies online | The Daily Scroll - February 16, 2009

    [...] How to deal with trolls, spammers, lawbreakers and meanies online February 16, 2009 Web Worker Daily (HT: Kent Shaffer) [...]