Archives For compassion international

The Humanity in Humanitarian

Kent Shaffer —  March 5, 2010

I’ve been a fan of Compassion International for a long time. Before Kenya, my wife and I sponsored a girl in India. I know Compassion does good work.

However, I am ashamed to admit that before Kenya I was detached from our sponsored girl in India. My wife would write her letters, but I seldom would read any of the correspondence. I thought that giving money and my wife’s letters were enough. I didn’t see the opportunity or realize the power of writing letters to my sponsored child.

I do now.

After just a few days in Kenya, it is plain to see that investing in a child through Compassion International is far more than giving money. These children are human with a real need for relationships. As a sponsor, you are their hero, so they desperately want to hear from you. Your words, no matter how simple, are an encouragement, a motivator, and giver of hope.

Your words are statistically proven to boost your child’s performance. They are statistically proven to improve the odds of breaking the cycle of poverty.

Let us not forget the humanity in humanitarian. If you sponsor a child, write them often. If you don’t sponsor a child, consider taking the journey that will change your life and a child’s life.

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Photos by Keely Marie Scott.

Get Gobsmacked :: Save Babies

Kent Shaffer —  March 5, 2010

Yesterday we visited one of Compassion International’s Child Survival Programs in Kenya. It provides prenatal care, food, supplements, health care, motherhood training, education, encouragement, spiritual training, and income generating opportunities (including microfinance).

Globally, 24,000 children under 5 die every day from preventable diseases, most within their first hours or days of life.

In Kenya, 22 million people (55% of population) live on less than $1.25 per day. And those with a job often support 10+ people financially. The Child Survival Program is designed to reach these mothers and some households earn as little as $10 per month.

MEET SCOLA

We met Scola, a mother of four who joined the Child Survival Program and found a new way of life. Not only did she learn a better way to raise her children, but through microfinance, she was also taught how to make and sell soap. Spending $7 on supplies, Scola could make $20 worth of soap. The $13 profits let her buy more soap and pay her $6 monthly rent.

Cloth drapes the walls to add beauty to her small one room shack. The family shares one bed. The roof is corrugated tin and the floor is cement. A sewage trench runs almost stagnate outside her home. Her husband struggles to find odd jobs. Scola is full of joy. The Child Survival Program has changed her life. It has enabled her.

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

MEET EUNICE

We also met Eunice. She makes necklaces since joining the Child Survival Program. She rolls slivers of old posters, calendars, and scrap paper into beads coated with varnish. Her smile was overwhelming. Her joy was contagious. She had dignity and humility. When asked about her dream for her son Stanley, she said:

I want him to do well in school… to go to university. I’d like him to become a doctor… and support others in the community.

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

GOBSMACKED

The people I met work incredibly hard to survive. The Child Survival Program and Child Sponsorship Program give these families a boost of hope and the rare opportunity to break the poverty cycle.  Think about Eunice’s hope for Stanley.

I want my child to be successful so that he can financially support others.

Compared to almost everyone in the United States, these people have nothing. But when they get something, they are looking to help others. Think about that. Get gobsmacked.

Currently, Kenya has 3,000 kids waited to be sponsored. The model is entirely scalable. They are just waiting on your support.

Comnpassion International

Kenya Day #1 (Photo Recap)

Kent Shaffer —  March 4, 2010

Here is a recap of Day #1 at Compassion International Kenya.

Photos by Ryan Detzel.

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Photos by Kent Shaffer.

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Photos by Keely Marie Scott.

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Compassion International

Owen

Kent Shaffer —  March 4, 2010

Compassion International Kenya

Today I met Owen. He is 8 years old and loves soccer, reading, and writing. He is a good student, ranking 3rd out of his class of 200. If he studies hard enough, he might get the opportunity to reach his dream of becoming a pilot one day. His parents work very hard to give him opportunities, to give him the chance to work hard and even to hope.

Today I also became Owen’s sponsor. My wife and I are excited to be a part. Becoming a Compassion International child sponsor is more than providing food, resources, education, and training to kids. The children and their families are grateful for that, but one of the biggest highlights for the kids is the chance to write letters and build a relationship with their sponsors over the years. In fact, some Compassion programs report a 20% improvement in school performance among children who receive 2 or more letters a year.

You can also have the privilege to invest in a child’s life by becoming a sponsor. It make seem like you are giving little money or little effort, but it creates a big impact. I can see it in the results and in the sparkle in Owen’s eyes when he spoke of sponsorship.

Compassion International in Kenya

Compassion International Kenya