6 Ways Technology Helps Make Disciples

Kent Shaffer —  April 14, 2014

Technology is a tool that when used well extends our natural reach and ability. In fact, these words are an example of how the internet and text can extend far beyond the reach of my voice. At the same time, when used poorly, technology can enslave its users. We’ve all seen people become obsessed with checking their phones or taking on more tech than they can handle. I’ve been that person.

So how do we use technology well for ministry?
How do we discover that sweet tension between doing just enough to reach our full potential but not so much it bogs us down?

Software like Church Community Builder is designed to extend your ministry’s reach. They aim to keep the cost and usability simple without compromising performance. But the real value is in how you choose to use it. So as you begin to think about how you use technology for ministry, consider the following 6 ways that tech can extend your reach and help make disciples.

(1) Identifying people’s gifts.

Church management software makes it much easier to easily identify people’s unique gifts and then equip them with opportunities to use them. In 1 Corinthians 12, Paul calls us all to live according to our gifts. Don’t pursue someone else’s spiritual gift but rather pursue what God has called you to be. Ideally, church leadership should be educating their individual congregants about their spiritual gifts, empowering them use their gifts, and holding them accountable in using their gifts well.

At the same time, church management software can also be used to track your congregation’s weak areas. In 1 Corinthians 12, Paul also explains how the church is like a body with many different yet equally important parts. What parts is your church body missing? It is easy to get comfortable in a sea of people wired just like you, but software can make it much easier to track and pinpoint needed roles and gifts.

(2) Creating a connection.

The gospel spreads best through relationship. Discipleship thrives under a mentorship role. While most would agree that one-on-one, face-to-face relationships are ideal, there are still many ways that technology can extend our reach to connect with people throughout each week. In fact, Nielsen reports that a surprising 91% of adults have their cell phone within arm’s reach 24/7. Keep in mind that while the technology exists to connect with church members throughout the week, its effectiveness is all in how you use it. Be prayerfully wise in what is the best way to digitally connect with the people you are called to reach.

(3) Following up with volunteers. & (4) Engaging newcomers.

Intending to do something doesn’t matter if it never gets done or gets done too late. I’ve seen too many visitors and too many potential volunteers slip through the cracks at churches because the leadership intended to follow up but became too busy. Personally, I need management software to keep track of newcomers and prospective volunteers. In both cases, quick follow up is a great way to make people very valued and wanted.

This is key particularly with newcomers. Hopefully, your church is healthy and friendly enough to engage newcomers with sincere hospitality during their first visit. Regardless, reaching out to newcomers a few days later is a great way to take the relationship to the next step.

(5) Measuring the ministry.

Only God can measure heart attitudes and real spiritual fruit. Yet man-made metrics can play a role in helping churches identify ministry needs, ministry engagement, and the probability of spiritual fruit.

Tracking good attendance, baptisms, and giving numbers do not guarantee of a healthy church, but it does hint at the probability of health. Tracking involvement hints at health and unmet needs, too. If attendance tracking identifies that single parents are struggling to bring their families to church, you are now aware of an opportunity to figure out how to serve them – be it making changes to church programs or even raising up leaders like Acts 6 to minister to them beyond the church walls.

Technology helps you define the key areas of engagement and measure that for individuals. Disciples are people engaged in ministry, so it’s important to remember that you can’t manage what you don’t measure.

(6) Informing decision-making.

Wise counsel is key for ministry. For 2,000 years, church leaders have benefited from the guidance of scripture and prayer and the advice of elders and overseers. Now we live in an era where we can leverage technology to gain insights into opportunities for improvement and unmet needs. Done well, analyzing data from church management software can reveal what efforts are likely most fruitful and which are not.

For more information about how technology can help your church, visit ChurchCommunityBuilder.com.

Special thanks to Church Community Builder for supporting Church Relevance by sponsoring this post.

Kent Shaffer

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I live in an RV with my wife and 2 kids and work with OpenChurch.com to help Christians collaborate and build a global Church library of free, open content.